about the author
 
ramchandraguha
Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bangalore. He has taught at the universities of Yale and Stanford, held the Arné Naess Chair at the University of Oslo, and been the Indo-American Community Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley.
In the academic year 2011-2 he served as the Philippe Roman Professor of History and International Affairs at the London School of Economics.

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 ABOUT The Website
This website presents a selection of Ramachandra Guha’s essays and columns. The writings are placed into five categories:
History
History reproduces columns that analyse interesting or important events and controveries of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Politics And Current Affairs
Politics and Current Affairs reproduces writings on secularism, modernity democracy, diversity, and other contentious themes in contemporary India.
Biography
Biography presents word-portraits of a range of fascinating or forgotten individuals in India and beyond.
Culture
Culture presents reflections on such non-serious but non-trivial matters as music, literature and travel.
Longer Essays
Longer Essays features a selection of Guha’s more reflective and extended articles (5,000 words or more) on history and politics.  Drawing on writings of the past decade-and-a-half, this website of Ramachandra Guha’s writings will be continuously updated to include his columns as they appear. Through these rich and varied essays, Guha seeks to capture the modern history of what he terms the ‘most interesting country in the world’.
 
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The Struggles Of A Muslim Modernizer
The Telegraph 08th July 2017
In different but complementary ways, the debate on triple talaq, and the debate on cow slaughter, both demonstrate the medievalist mindset of modern India. READ MORE.....

Why This Revival Of Hindu Chauvinism?
Hindustan Times 02nd July 2017
Some years ago, I was at a literary meeting in Bhubaneshwar. Odia had just been declared the sixth classical language in India, after Tamil, Sanskrit, Telugu, Kannada and Malayalam. My scholarly hosts were naturally delighted; one taking particular pleasure in imagining how President Pranab Mukherjee felt when he signed the relevant file, since his mother tongue, Bengali, would never remotely be considered a ‘classical’ language. READ MORE.....

The Rise And Fall Of The Term 'Harijan'
The Telegraph 10th June 2017
In his 1984 book The Untouchable as Himself, the anthropologist R. S. Khare speaks of the derision with which Dalits viewed the term ‘Harijan’, popularized by Mahatma Gandhi. Khare quotes a Chamar reformer in Lucknow as telling him: ‘Harijan means what we can never be allowed to become by the caste Hindu, and what we may not want to be anyway. It was a superficial way for Gandhi to resolve his guilt’. READ MORE.....

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