about the author
 
ramchandraguha
Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bangalore. He has taught at the universities of Yale and Stanford, held the Arné Naess Chair at the University of Oslo, and been the Indo-American Community Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley.
In the academic year 2011-2 he served as the Philippe Roman Professor of History and International Affairs at the London School of Economics.

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 ABOUT The Website
This website presents a selection of Ramachandra Guha’s essays and columns. The writings are placed into five categories:
History
History reproduces columns that analyse interesting or important events and controveries of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Politics And Current Affairs
Politics and Current Affairs reproduces writings on secularism, modernity democracy, diversity, and other contentious themes in contemporary India.
Biography
Biography presents word-portraits of a range of fascinating or forgotten individuals in India and beyond.
Culture
Culture presents reflections on such non-serious but non-trivial matters as music, literature and travel.
Longer Essays
Longer Essays features a selection of Guha’s more reflective and extended articles (5,000 words or more) on history and politics.  Drawing on writings of the past decade-and-a-half, this website of Ramachandra Guha’s writings will be continuously updated to include his columns as they appear. Through these rich and varied essays, Guha seeks to capture the modern history of what he terms the ‘most interesting country in the world’.
 
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Why I'm Not Nostalgic For An Undivided India
Hindustan Times 16th August 2015
Sixty-eight years is a fairly advanced age for an individual, but a small span of time in the life of a nation. This must be why, every so often, a book or article appears lamenting the Partition of India in 1947. These blame the Congress, the Muslim League, Gandhi, Jinnah, Nehru, Patel—sometimes one, sometimes several, sometimes all of the above—for not doing enough to keep India together, or for actively aiding in its division. These books and articles then feed into what appears to be a widespread popular sentiment, to the effect that the citizens of what are now India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, would have been better off had they all been part of the same country. READ MORE.....

An Opposition to Despair Of
The Telegraph 08th August 2015
I spent the last week of July in New Delhi, my first extended trip to that city since the General Elections of 2014. It was a year and two months since the Modi Government had come to power, and signs of disenchantment had set in. Scholars, executives, restaurant waiters, and security personnel all made sarcastic remarks about the Prime Minister and his Government. Some flagged Modi’s love of foreign travel, others spoke of the gap between promises made and delivery on the ground. Even long-time supporters of the BJP were critical of some of the Prime Minister’s Cabinet colleagues, for their lack of effective stewardship of the Ministries under their charge READ MORE.....

The Only Lesson That History Can Teach Us
Hindustan Times 02nd August 2015
I am sometimes asked about the ‘lessons’ that history can teach us. The question presumes that the study of the past can help provide guidance for the present—and future. But is this presumption accurate? Can politicians exercise power more wisely if they are better informed about the past? READ MORE.....

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In Praise Of Ramachandra Guha
Look hard enough, and you can find certain similarities between Niall Ferguson, the current holder of the Philippe Roman chair at the LSE, and Ram Guha, who, it was announced last week, will succeed him in September. Both men like to engage audiences wider than the nearest senior common room; both have a pronounced impishness; and neither shirks from controversy (Guha has described the polemics of Arundhati Roy as "ventures into social science ... self-regarding and self-indulgent ... and also self-contradictory"). But Guha, in both career and writing, is a far more various creature than most of his predecessors.
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