about the author
 
ramchandraguha
Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bangalore. He has taught at the universities of Yale and Stanford, held the Arné Naess Chair at the University of Oslo, and been the Indo-American Community Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley.
In the academic year 2011-2 he served as the Philippe Roman Professor of History and International Affairs at the London School of Economics.

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 ABOUT The Website
This website presents a selection of Ramachandra Guha’s essays and columns. The writings are placed into five categories:
History
History reproduces columns that analyse interesting or important events and controveries of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Politics And Current Affairs
Politics and Current Affairs reproduces writings on secularism, modernity democracy, diversity, and other contentious themes in contemporary India.
Biography
Biography presents word-portraits of a range of fascinating or forgotten individuals in India and beyond.
Culture
Culture presents reflections on such non-serious but non-trivial matters as music, literature and travel.
Longer Essays
Longer Essays features a selection of Guha’s more reflective and extended articles (5,000 words or more) on history and politics.  Drawing on writings of the past decade-and-a-half, this website of Ramachandra Guha’s writings will be continuously updated to include his columns as they appear. Through these rich and varied essays, Guha seeks to capture the modern history of what he terms the ‘most interesting country in the world’.
 
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A Jewel of Bengaluru And India
Hindustan Times 29th July 2018
Once, when some of his fellow Hindus were glorifying the practice of sati, Mahatma Gandhi remarked that ‘self-immolation at the death of the husband is not a sign of enlightenment but of gross ignorance’. If she truly loved her deceased husband, said Gandhi, the wife would not commit sati but dedicate her life to the fulfilment of his ideals ‘for his family and country’. READ MORE.....

Speaking Satire To Power
The Telegraph 21st July 2018
Milan Kundera once spoke of the importance, for subjects of a totalitarian regime, of  ‘the struggle of memory against forgetting.’ As important, to the  citizens of a (professedly) democratic regime, is the struggle of satire against power. Rahul Gandhi has been the butt of jokes ever since he entered politics, and, more recently, Narendra Modi has found himself mocked in private, on social media, and in print. His frequent references to himself in the third person, the astonishing suit with his name on it which he wore when meeting Barack Obama, and his tendency to clasp foreign leaders (male and female) in close, crippling, hugs have all attracted a flood of jokes both visual and verbal. READ MORE.....

When The State Took A Poet To The People
The Telegraph 23rd June 2018
In some Western countries, copyright to an author’s work lapses seventy-five years after his or her death. In India, the time period is slightly shorter; sixty years. Thus, until 2001 the copyright in Rabindranath Tagore’s writings vested with Santiniketan; till 2008, it was Navajivan Press which controlled access to Mahatma Gandhi’s oeuvre. The copyright in Jawaharlal Nehru’s writings will be with Sonia Gandhi until May 2024. READ MORE.....

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