THE RISE AND FALL OF THE BILINGUAL INTELLECTUAL, Economic and Political Weekly [Saturday, January 23rd, 2010]

This essay is inspired by an argument between the scholar-libarian B. S. Kesavan and his son Mukul that I was once privy to. I forget what they were fighting about. But I recall that the father, then past ninety years of age, was giving as good as he got. At periodic intervals he would turn [...]

 
 
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  ADIVASIS, NAXALITES, AND INDIAN DEMOCRACY, Economic and Political Weekly [Saturday, August 11th, 2007]

On 13th December 1946, Jawaharlal Nehru moved the Objectives Resolution in the Constituent Assembly of India. This proclaimed that the soon-to-be-free nation would be an ‘Independent Sovereign Republic’. Its Constitution would guarantee citizens ‘justice, social, economic and political; equality of status; of opportunity, and before the law; freedom of thought, expression, belief, faith, worship, vocation, [...]

 
 
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  PLURALISM IN THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY, Economic and Political Weekly [Saturday, February 17th, 2007]

Earlier this year, the National Archives mounted an exhibition on the founding of the first modern universities in India. A Kolkata newspaper gave its report on this exhibition the headline: ‘The Other Revolution of 1857’. This was apt, for the founding of these universities was indeed a revolution, and indeed also the ‘other’ to the [...]

 
 
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  HOW MUCH SHOULD A PERSON CONSUME? University of California Press, Chapter IX [Saturday, February 18th, 2006]

“The United States is presiding at a general reorganization of the ways of living throughout the world.” André Siegfried, speaking in 1932 This chapter takes as its point of departure an old essay by John Kenneth Galbraith—an essay so ancient and obscure that it might very well have been forgotten even by its prolific author. [...]

 
 
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  THE ONES WHO STAYED BEHIND, Economic and Political Weekly [Saturday, March 22nd, 2003]

This essay is inspired, or more accurately perhaps provoked, by an invitation to participate in a cross-cultural symposium on ‘New Trends in South Asian Studies’. The symposium’s organizers suggested that while ‘Europe has long developed research traditions and produced much scholarly work on Asia’, it was ‘only in the last two decades that an increased [...]

 
 
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  THE ENVIRONMENTALIST OF THE POOR: ANIL AGARWAL, Economic and Political Weekly [Saturday, January 19th, 2002]

The Berkeley Nobel Laureate George Akerlof once remarked of his fellow economists that if you showed them something that worked in practice, they would not be satisfied unless it was also seen to work in theory. This insight explains much about the dismal science, including why, as late as 1980, the M. I. T. economist [...]

 
 
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